Wickedly wonderful Wiener…

Schnitzel!

Story & photos by Dr. Micgael Lim The Travelling GourmetTM

All rights reserved

The suave and intrepid tells you about the best Wienerschnitzels in…


MAGNIFICENT Wien. Crispy outside, moist and very tender inside, thin yet very satisfying to eat…classic Viennese
Wienerschnitzel is a super-thin crumbed slice of veal (usually about 800g)  flash fried in very hot oil until gold-brown. OMG! YUMMY! It is then served with a lemon wedge, sometimes Ligonberry jam and Kartoffel potato salat (German Potato Salad) or Pomme Frites (French Fries) or boiled potatoes with parsley and butter, but not all three. You squeeze fresh lemon juice on the Schnitzel before enjoying it.

Legend has it that gold dust was added to the crumb mixture in order to achieve even better golden brown color.

Wiener Schnitzel simply means…

Schnitzel in the Viennese style. Vienna is Wien in Oesterreich.
Like Champagne, the term Wiener Schnitzel is protected by law. All and any schnitzel called by that name MUST be made from veal.
“Wiener Schnitzel and its Italian counterpart, Cotoletta Milanese, involved two Hapsburg domains in a bitter culinary dispute. Both Austrian and Italian branches of the family claimed credit for the invention of the dish. The Italian branch traced their claim way back to a banquet in 1134 for the Canon of Milan‘s St. Ambrogio Cathedral.”

 Historical Fact
Man has pounded meat to make it tender for thousands of years. However, there is eveidence that Apicus in Roman times (1st Century BC) prepared a thin slice of meat coated dredged in bread crumbs and then fried it in the 1 century BC. Apicus was credited with writing the 1st cookbook.

Roman Legions brought their cuisine to the Germanic countries they conquered…

In the Middle Ages, records reveal that it was very popular in both Northern Italy, and what is now Austria. Veal was the meat of choice.

In Northern Italy this dish goes back to a banquet given in 1134 for the canon of Milan’s St. Ambrogio Cathedral.”A dish was served called Cotoletta alla Milanese. Very similar to the Austrian Schnitzel BUT it was a veal chop with bone, pounded and breaded and served with lemon.

The main difference is the Italian version has the bone-in BUT the  Austrian version is boneless.

Another legend is that Wiener Schnitzel goes back to at least 1862. A famous Austrian General that was based close close to Milan, introduced it.

 

Figlmüllers restaurant in
Wien

Figlmüllers arguably makes the biggest & best Schnitzel in Wien. It is NOT Wienerschnitzel because they use pork! The Schwein-Schnitzel goes into 4 different pans to get the perfect level crispiness.

Please see related article:

https://thetravellinggourmet.wordpress.com/2013/03/20/wine-wurst-duesseldorf/

To be continued…

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About thetravellinggourmet

As a renowned Travel, Food & Wine Writer he has travelled the world in a keen & indomitable pursuit of exotic delicacies & fine wines. His articles have been published in over 20 prestigious publications, both local & international. Dr. Lim has toured and trained in Wine Evaluation & Oenology in most of the world's top wine producing areas from France to Australia. The Travelling Gourmet says, "Gastronomy has no frontier. These are the gastronomic voyages of The Travelling Gourmet. My unending mission. To explore strange new cusines, to seek out new wines and new culinary experiences, to boldly go where no gourmet has gone before...." All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any other information storage & retrieval system, without permission from Dr. Michael Lim The Travelling Gourmet and/or MSN. Material may be works of fiction. Names, characters, places and incidents may be true but may also be products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance whatsoever to actual person or persons, either dead or living, events, or locales may be entirely and purely coincidental and unintentional. No part of this website may be used to villify others or for criminal purposes. Interests: Travel, Food, Wines, Cooking, Wine Appreciation, Parachuting, Languages, Music, Reading, Swimming, Hunting, Ballet, Fencing, Archery, Anthropology and more... The Travelling Gourmet is a copyrighted trademark. All rights and photos reserved. No part may be reproduced without permission.
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